This project is supported by The Central Qld Coast Landcare Network through funding from the Australian Government's Caring for our Country

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Peach Leafed Poison Bush; Poison Peach

(Trema tomentosa, fam. Ulmaceae)

Trema tomentosa Trema tomentosa Trema tomentosa Trema tomentosa Trema tomentosa
A multi-stemmed shrub or small tree usually 2-4m, though sometimes growing to around 6m.
Form or habit: Shrub or small tree
Latex:Absent
Leaf:Simple Alternate

Alternate, egg shaped to oval, 2-12.5 x1.5-5 cm, coarse (rough to touch), hairy, with serrated margins and prominent veins which usually extend for at least half the length of the leaf. Paler underneath.

Flower conspicuous: Inconspicuous
Flower colour: Greenish to cream-yellow.
Flower description:Greenish to cream-yellow, 5-petalled, 0.1-0.2cm long, borne in small clusters in the leaf axils.
Fruit conspicuous: Conspicuous
Fruit colour: Black
Fruit: Fleshy
Fruit description: Black globular, fleshy, 0.2-0.3cm diameter
Habitat:Rainforest,Vine thicket,Woodland/ open forest
Distribution:Widespread in coastal and inland districts, often found in dryer forest, in rainforest margins and regrowth and in eucalypt woodland in most states of Australia.
Food source for:Fruit eaten by many birds including brown cuckoo dove, Lewin’s honeyeater, figbird and olive-backed Oriole. Larval food plant for speckled line-blue butterfly and the splendid ghost moth.
Toxicity:Toxic if ingested,Toxic or irritant to domestic pets
Origin:Australia
Weed:No
Weed status:
Notes:Reported to be toxic to stock. The level of toxicity varies between individual plants but is considered most dangerous when stock have little else to eat. It should not be confused with the closely related, larger, non-toxic Peach Cedar (T. orientalis)
Information sources: Melzer R. & Plumb J. (2007) Plants of Capricornia.,Society for Growing Australian Plant Townsville Branch Inc. (1994) Across the Top Gardening with Australian Plants in the tropics.
Milson J. (2000) DPI Trees and Shrubs of north-west Queensland, Jackes B. (2003) Plants of Magnetic Island 2nd ed.

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