This project is supported by The Central Qld Coast Landcare Network through funding from the Australian Government's Caring for our Country

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Native Hibiscus

(Hibiscus heterophyllus subsp. heterophyllus, fam. Malvaceae)

Hibiscus heterophyllus subsp. heterophyllus Hibiscus heterophyllus subsp. heterophyllus Hibiscus heterophyllus subsp. heterophyllus Hibiscus heterophyllus subsp. heterophyllus Hibiscus heterophyllus subsp. heterophyllus
A shrub to small tree from 2 to 6 metres. Aborigines used the white, strong and fine fibre to make dilly-bags. They also use many components of the plant as a food source.
Form or habit: Shrub or small tree
Latex:Absent
Leaf:Simple Alternate

Alternate, simple or three lobed; margins are finely toothed. The leaves and stems are somewhat prickly hairy.

Flower conspicuous: Conspicuous
Flower colour: Yellow
Flower description:The flowers are large and showy up to 15cm in diameter. Petals are yellow, white or pink with maroon centres. Yellow being the most common in this region. The flowers normally open about mid-morning and close by mid-afternoon.
Fruit conspicuous: Conspicuous
Fruit colour: Brown
Fruit: Dry
Fruit description: The fruit are rosella-like, 5 valved capsules containing dark brown seeds.
Habitat:Gallery (Riverine or riparian) forest,Woodland/ open forest
Distribution:Eastern Queensland and New South Wales and the Northern Territory.
Food source for:Early settlers used the fruits to make ‘rosella’ jam. Attracts many species of insects: larval food plant for some moth species.
Toxicity:No toxicity known
Origin:Australia
Weed:No
Weed status:
Notes:
Information sources: Melzer R. & Plumb J. (2007) Plants of Capricornia.

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